The angel has the phone box
I dunno, man. I reblog things. Some fandom things, some pretty things, some social issues things... mostly just things.

20 I Minnesota I Female I Writer
Sometimes I fancy I'm good at stuff.

Also, My boyfriend has band called My Name is Ellipsis, and they are good at stuff, and you should love them.


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zulidoodles:

[[I had to ok I watched this dang movie four times already]]

3 hours ago on August 22nd, 2014 | J | 89,783 notes
feliscanis:

fleshcircus:

wolveswolves:

Wolves cooperate but dogs submit, study suggests
19 August 2014


For dog lovers, comparative psychologists Friederike Range and Zsófia Virányi have an unsettling conclusion. Many researchers think that as humans domesticated wolves, they selected for a cooperative nature, resulting in animals keen to pitch in on tasks with humans. But when the two scientists at the Messerli Research Institute at the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna studied lab-raised dog and wolf packs, they found that wolves were the tolerant, cooperative ones. The dogs, in contrast, formed strict, linear dominance hierarchies that demand obedience from subordinates, Range explained last week at the Animal Behavior Society meeting at Princeton University. As wolves became dogs, she thinks, they were bred for the ability to follow orders and to be dependent on human masters.
Range and Virányi developed their new portrayal of dogs and wolves by giving a series of tests to socialized packs of mixed-breed dogs and wolves, four packs of each species, containing anywhere from two to six animals each. The scientists raised all the animals from about 10 days old at the Wolf Science Center in Game Park Ernstbrunn, Austria, living with them 24 hours a day until they were introduced to pack life, so that they were accustomed to humans.
Range and her colleagues tested the dogs’ and wolves’ tolerance for their fellow pack members with a mealtime challenge. The researchers paired a high-ranking dog with a low-ranking pack buddy and set out a bowl of food, then gave the same challenge to a pair of wolves. In every matchup, “the higher ranking dog monopolized the food,” Range told the meeting. “But in the wolf tests, both high- and low-ranking animals had access” and were able to chow down at the same time. At times, the more dominant wolves were “mildly aggressive toward their subordinates, but a lower ranking dog won’t even try” when paired with a top dog, Range said. “They don’t dare to challenge.”
Wolves also beat the hounds on tests that assessed whether the canids were able to follow the gaze of their fellows to find food. “They are very cooperative with each other, and when they have a disagreement or must make a group decision, they have a lot of communication or ‘talk’ first,” Range said.  The same was not true for the center’s dog packs; for even the smallest transgression, a higher ranked dog “may react aggressively” toward one that is subordinate.
Range and Virányi suspect that the relationship between dogs and humans is hierarchical, with humans as top dogs, rather than cooperative, as in wolf packs. The notion of “dog-human cooperation” needs to be reconsidered, Range said, as well as “the hypotheses that domestication enhanced dogs’ cooperative abilities.” Instead, our ancestors bred dogs for obedience and dependency. “It’s not about having a common goal,” Range said. “It’s about being with us, but without conflict. We tell them something, and they obey.”
“It’s wonderful work,” says James Serpell, an ethologist at the University of Pennsylvania. “But it’s not what the dog training community wants to hear; you can’t say the word ‘dominance’ around them. Does dominance exist as a phenomenon in dogs? The answer is clearly ‘yes,’ ” Serpell says, although he notes that there are breed differences. Other researchers, for example, have shown that when in packs, poodles and Labrador retrievers are more aggressive than are malamutes and German shepherds.     
Monique Udell, an animal behaviorist at Oregon State University, Corvallis, says her own study of dog and wolf behavior, also presented at the meeting, supports Range’s contention that dogs are waiting for orders. To find out if dogs are “independent problem solvers,” she presented 20 adult dogs (10 pets and 10 from shelters) with sealed containers of summer sausage. Each animal was allotted 2 minutes to open it. Ten captive wolves were given the same test. Not one of the adult dogs succeeded; most did not even try. Meanwhile, eight of the 10 wolves opened the container in less than 2 minutes. So did dog puppies, indicating that dogs are no less capable of the task than wolves, but “as the dog grows and becomes more dependent on its human owner that [independent] behavior is inhibited,” Udell said.
Underscoring the point, she found that adult pooches could open the container after all—when their human owner told them to do so. Because dogs “suppress their independence, it’s difficult to know what their normal problem-solving abilities are,” she told the meeting.
It may be that we have to give Fido a command to find out.


Source

The bit about the dog training doesn’t make sense to me.
First and foremost I thought a large majority of dog trainers believed in things like having to “dominate” your dog.Secondly, even people who don’t believe in this, I think for the most part do not say “dominance doesn’t exist” they mainly agree that its much more contextual than previously though (and of course this all depends on how you define dominance). As in, not EVERYTHING dogs do is a way to gain a higher spot in the social hierarchy.. like when people say things such as “dont let your dog through the door first hes trying to dominate you” and that kind of bs.
And of COURSE dogs were domesticated to obey… over time, more so. But if you’ve ever met or worked with any extremely primitive breeds/land races, like the numerous types of LGDs that are out there, you will see that they are often significantly more independent and far more co-operative with one another as well as far less obedient.
When I saw this study being put out it was often referred to as “surprising” that wolves are better at co-operating with one another and I have to ask… why? Why is that surprising at all? You’re surprised that a pack animal that has not been altered through history is good at co-operating with the same type of pack animal? Really? And the one that has been altered by humans for literally thousands of years isn’t as good at co-operating with its own species? Maybe that has something to do with the fact that they have literally been bred to communicate with people and do jobs for people. All this says about dominance is that dogs will show dominance(or submission) to one another if left to their own devices and presumably not taught how to behave in a neutral manner around other dogs. That’s like saying “if we put really confident, aggressive people in a room with people who are really shy and nervous, the confident and aggressive people will take charge of the situation/task at hand” wow no way, I wouldn’t have thought that.
What I know is going to happen now is a shit ton of people are going to say “this study proves I need to be dominant over my dog!” and use it as some sort of justification to alpha roll their dog and be a prick needlessly. There’s a difference between being a strong leader and consistently “dominating” your dog like a fucking asshole.


omg thank you

feliscanis:

fleshcircus:

wolveswolves:

Wolves cooperate but dogs submit, study suggests

19 August 2014

For dog lovers, comparative psychologists Friederike Range and Zsófia Virányi have an unsettling conclusion. Many researchers think that as humans domesticated wolves, they selected for a cooperative nature, resulting in animals keen to pitch in on tasks with humans. But when the two scientists at the Messerli Research Institute at the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna studied lab-raised dog and wolf packs, they found that wolves were the tolerant, cooperative ones. The dogs, in contrast, formed strict, linear dominance hierarchies that demand obedience from subordinates, Range explained last week at the Animal Behavior Society meeting at Princeton University. As wolves became dogs, she thinks, they were bred for the ability to follow orders and to be dependent on human masters.

Range and Virányi developed their new portrayal of dogs and wolves by giving a series of tests to socialized packs of mixed-breed dogs and wolves, four packs of each species, containing anywhere from two to six animals each. The scientists raised all the animals from about 10 days old at the Wolf Science Center in Game Park Ernstbrunn, Austria, living with them 24 hours a day until they were introduced to pack life, so that they were accustomed to humans.

Range and her colleagues tested the dogs’ and wolves’ tolerance for their fellow pack members with a mealtime challenge. The researchers paired a high-ranking dog with a low-ranking pack buddy and set out a bowl of food, then gave the same challenge to a pair of wolves. In every matchup, “the higher ranking dog monopolized the food,” Range told the meeting. “But in the wolf tests, both high- and low-ranking animals had access” and were able to chow down at the same time. At times, the more dominant wolves were “mildly aggressive toward their subordinates, but a lower ranking dog won’t even try” when paired with a top dog, Range said. “They don’t dare to challenge.”

Wolves also beat the hounds on tests that assessed whether the canids were able to follow the gaze of their fellows to find food. “They are very cooperative with each other, and when they have a disagreement or must make a group decision, they have a lot of communication or ‘talk’ first,” Range said.  The same was not true for the center’s dog packs; for even the smallest transgression, a higher ranked dog “may react aggressively” toward one that is subordinate.

Range and Virányi suspect that the relationship between dogs and humans is hierarchical, with humans as top dogs, rather than cooperative, as in wolf packs. The notion of “dog-human cooperation” needs to be reconsidered, Range said, as well as “the hypotheses that domestication enhanced dogs’ cooperative abilities.” Instead, our ancestors bred dogs for obedience and dependency. “It’s not about having a common goal,” Range said. “It’s about being with us, but without conflict. We tell them something, and they obey.”

“It’s wonderful work,” says James Serpell, an ethologist at the University of Pennsylvania. “But it’s not what the dog training community wants to hear; you can’t say the word ‘dominance’ around them. Does dominance exist as a phenomenon in dogs? The answer is clearly ‘yes,’ ” Serpell says, although he notes that there are breed differences. Other researchers, for example, have shown that when in packs, poodles and Labrador retrievers are more aggressive than are malamutes and German shepherds.     

Monique Udell, an animal behaviorist at Oregon State University, Corvallis, says her own study of dog and wolf behavior, also presented at the meeting, supports Range’s contention that dogs are waiting for orders. To find out if dogs are “independent problem solvers,” she presented 20 adult dogs (10 pets and 10 from shelters) with sealed containers of summer sausage. Each animal was allotted 2 minutes to open it. Ten captive wolves were given the same test. Not one of the adult dogs succeeded; most did not even try. Meanwhile, eight of the 10 wolves opened the container in less than 2 minutes. So did dog puppies, indicating that dogs are no less capable of the task than wolves, but “as the dog grows and becomes more dependent on its human owner that [independent] behavior is inhibited,” Udell said.

Underscoring the point, she found that adult pooches could open the container after all—when their human owner told them to do so. Because dogs “suppress their independence, it’s difficult to know what their normal problem-solving abilities are,” she told the meeting.

It may be that we have to give Fido a command to find out.

Source

The bit about the dog training doesn’t make sense to me.

First and foremost I thought a large majority of dog trainers believed in things like having to “dominate” your dog.
Secondly, even people who don’t believe in this, I think for the most part do not say “dominance doesn’t exist” they mainly agree that its much more contextual than previously though (and of course this all depends on how you define dominance). As in, not EVERYTHING dogs do is a way to gain a higher spot in the social hierarchy.. like when people say things such as “dont let your dog through the door first hes trying to dominate you” and that kind of bs.

And of COURSE dogs were domesticated to obey… over time, more so. But if you’ve ever met or worked with any extremely primitive breeds/land races, like the numerous types of LGDs that are out there, you will see that they are often significantly more independent and far more co-operative with one another as well as far less obedient.

When I saw this study being put out it was often referred to as “surprising” that wolves are better at co-operating with one another and I have to ask… why? Why is that surprising at all? You’re surprised that a pack animal that has not been altered through history is good at co-operating with the same type of pack animal? Really? And the one that has been altered by humans for literally thousands of years isn’t as good at co-operating with its own species? Maybe that has something to do with the fact that they have literally been bred to communicate with people and do jobs for people. All this says about dominance is that dogs will show dominance(or submission) to one another if left to their own devices and presumably not taught how to behave in a neutral manner around other dogs. That’s like saying “if we put really confident, aggressive people in a room with people who are really shy and nervous, the confident and aggressive people will take charge of the situation/task at hand” wow no way, I wouldn’t have thought that.

What I know is going to happen now is a shit ton of people are going to say “this study proves I need to be dominant over my dog!” and use it as some sort of justification to alpha roll their dog and be a prick needlessly. There’s a difference between being a strong leader and consistently “dominating” your dog like a fucking asshole.

omg thank you

3 hours ago on August 22nd, 2014 | J | 676 notes

runecestershire:

tyreenosaurusrex:

In honor of Shakespeare’s 450th birthday, I would like to take this moment and share a profound quotation from the bard:

image

Such mastery of the English language.

Remember that when this goes down, they are indoors.

3 hours ago on August 22nd, 2014 | J | 35,677 notes

4.01 | Lazarus Rising

3 hours ago on August 22nd, 2014 | J | 1,257 notes
3 hours ago on August 22nd, 2014 | J | 196,499 notes

swanqueenidiot:

Okay so the Colbert Report posted a link to the Ellen Page interview, right

image

And I was already happy it was a fan favorite. But THE COMMENTS

image

I MEAN

image

IT’S JUST TOO GREAT

image

ADAM AND EVE NOT ADAM AND MAPLE LEAF

3 hours ago on August 22nd, 2014 | J | 8,397 notes
3 hours ago on August 22nd, 2014 | J | 2,872 notes
smurflewis:

colouredsounds97:

J.K Rowling added this to the series.

THANKS SATAN

smurflewis:

colouredsounds97:

J.K Rowling added this to the series.

THANKS SATAN

3 hours ago on August 22nd, 2014 | J | 235,361 notes

tittily:

tenouttatenasses:

sandandglass:

Source

That’s the nicest thing I’ve seen today.

imagine being that one guy who broke an 11 hour kindness chain

3 hours ago on August 22nd, 2014 | J | 43,075 notes

tropicalfruitbabe:

*doesn’t check bank account*
*pretends everything is fine*

3 hours ago on August 22nd, 2014 | J | 126,584 notes

hughxjackman:

X-men: Days of Future Past (May 23rd 2014)

3 hours ago on August 22nd, 2014 | J | 12,351 notes

trekbatch:

everyone cry

3 hours ago on August 22nd, 2014 | J | 73,067 notes

mostingeniusparadox:

Secret Avengers #7

4 hours ago on August 22nd, 2014 | J | 112 notes
4 hours ago on August 22nd, 2014 | J | 823 notes
I hope one day you’re as happy as you’re pretending to be.
4 hours ago on August 22nd, 2014 | J | 224,866 notes